This is default featured slide 1 title
This is default featured slide 2 title
 

Monthly Archives: June 2018

Types of Icing for Cakes

• Frostings – This is often made with butter mixed with icing sugar and has the inclusion of pasteurised egg white that makes it firm to stay intact when piped on cupcakes. Cupcakes serve as miniature cakes that give you the freedom to decorate it the way you want to. You could add colour to the frosting mixture to give the cup cakes a peppy look.

• Fondant – It is an opaque covering made with a mixture of sugar, gelatine, and glycerine to give it dough-like consistency. Fondant is often used to replace icing, especially for wedding cakes. It protects the cake from falling apart, and as the fondant doesn’t melt away with humidity, it is a preferred type of icing by several who feel that it acts as a protective layer as well as serves as a decorative.

• Buttercream – This made by mixing butter with milk, icing sugar, and vanilla essence until it gains a consistency as that of an icing. These are used for cakes that are meant for immediate consumption or those that are stored in cold areas. Buttercream tends to melt as soon as it is out from refrigeration. It is a perfect option while organising birthday parties at home and serving cakes or cupcakes to guest to be consumed immediately.

• Ganache – It is a chocolate icing made after whipping dark chocolate with cream. The texture is often thick and heavy and should often be paired with a cake that is heavy such as a mud cake. Having it over a sponge cake would defy the work of the cake and thus focussing more on the icing.

About Organic Bone Broth

People still love it owing to its delicious taste. And the bones themselves have a wide array of benefits to offer. For instance, sipping down delicious organic bone broth on a wintry evening remains a source of relief for those suffering from a cough and cold. Even if you’re not suffering from a cold, bone broth can act as a soothing and beneficial food. At times, even your physician might recommend stock for you. Bone broth contains cysteine, which is an amino acid. It is very effective in offering you relief from a cold since it leads to the thinning of mucus in your lungs and facilitates easy breathing.

Broth also remains a staple for people suffering from arthritis or joint pain. The tendons and cartilage contain several minerals that turn out to be useful when it comes to promoting relief from joint pain. The proteins help in the rebuilding of your connective tissue and tendons, thereby facilitating a fast cure from joint pain.

The knuckles and feet contain gelatin in copious amounts. This gelatin is comprised of hydrophobic colloids that are very helpful in filling up holes in the intestine because they can retain liquids for a long period of time.

There was a time when our ancestors use to have chicken bone broth prepared in pots. They used to have them in copious amounts. Though bone broth remains an easy dish to prepare, modern homemakers, students and working adults often don’t get the time to prepare it at home. However, that doesn’t mean that they have to deprive themselves of the delicious broth with such a huge number of benefits. There are reliable stores offering ready made organic chicken soup. You can place your orders right from your homes. Not only do they deliver food within a desirable time frame, but they also keep on experimenting with different bone broth recipes so that you don’t get bored easily. Their services are backed by trained chefs who are committed to offering you mineral-rich broth preparations rendered in selected aromatics and varied garnishing. Plus, they also use high quality stainless steel utensils to process their products.

Lime Pie

Appearing in the early 20th century the exact origins are unknown, but the first recorded mention of Key lime pie may have been made by William Curry, a ship salvager and Key West’s first millionaire. Supposedly his cook, “Aunt Sally”, created the pie for him. It seems his crews of sponge fishermen at sea did not have access to ovens but the original version allowed the creamy pie to be prepared without baking. Early writings state that Aunt Sally’s version called for a graham cracker crust and softly whipped cream.

Many cooks and bakers in Florida claim their recipe is the only authentic version. Be that as it may, the filling is rarely disputed: rather, most debates revolve around the crust and topping. Everyone does agree, however, that green food coloring is for amateurs, and a proper version should be pale yellow. Key limes (also called Mexican or West Indian limes) are the most common lime found throughout the world; the U.S. is the exception in preferring the larger Persian lime.

The two contentious versions center around crust and topping. Early pies probably didn’t even have a crust, but now locals vacillate between traditional pie crust and graham cracker. And then there is the topping. The two camps argue meringue vs. whipped cream. (Apparently these folks have a lot of time on their hands.) Contrary to popular belief, what makes the filling creamy is not cream at all but sweetened condensed milk which is thicker than evaporated milk and comes in a can, first introduced by the Borden Dairy company in the late 1800s. It’s possible that if the sponge divers had anything to do with the pie, they indeed had plenty of canned milk, eggs and Key limes on board (and plenty of sponges for clean-up).

In other countries where Key limes grow, they are used more commonly in many dishes and as a popular flavoring. Although grown for centuries in Asian and South America, they didn’t make an appearance in the U.S. until the late 1800s. which means foodie president Thomas Jefferson missed out entirely. (How he would have loved those pies!)

If you visit Key West, pie factories and bakeries abound, and you can literally eat your way from one end to the other, reveling in the different offerings and deciding for yourself which one you like best. There are also shops which sell dozens of products enhanced with Key lime, such as moisturizers, potpourri, candles, soaps, candies and cookies. Unfortunately for much of America, procuring authentic Key limes is not always easy, and using regular limes just won’t do. Oh sure, you can buy bottled juice which the locals would frown on, but for some it’s better than nothing.

Southern Desserts

In most convenience stores, you can’t miss the display of Moon Pies (not really pies but more like sandwich cookies) sitting on the counter, just begging to be snatched up. They’re a southern tradition, kind of like their version of s’mores, made with graham crackers and marshmallow filling, then dipped in chocolate or butterscotch coating. Don’t try to make them yourself. Opt instead for a chocolate or lemon chess pie, which is easy, served in a single crust and contains a dense, sugary filling. Another no-brainer, fruit cobblers can be single or double crust, baked in a casserole dish and can have a crumbly topping sprinkled over the fruit filling, rather than a pie crust topping. Southerners like to use buttermilk biscuits on top. Sugar pie, originally from southern Indiana, is basically a custard base with lots of brown sugar or molasses, single crust. (Diabetics beware.)

Pies came to America with the first English settlers. Early colonists baked their pies in long narrow pans called “coffins” which also referred to a crust. (Not very appetizing for sure.) Centuries earlier, most pies were filled with meat and eaten as a main course, and early desserts were kept simple, featuring fruits and nuts. But American colonists used fruits from their orchards, replacing centuries of meat fillings, and it was during the American Revolution that the word “crust” replaced the less appealing term coffyn (original spelling). Probably a good idea, as our foodie President Thomas Jefferson would have frowned on serving desserts with coffyns at the White House. (His guests thanked him.)

In the summers when fruit was plentiful, early cooks prepared a crust, filled it with apples or peaches, and called it cobbler (sometimes referred to as a “crisp” or apple brown betty, both close cousins). The origin of red velvet cake plays a tug of war between New York and the South, making its debut in the mid-twentieth century, and each region has its own slightly different version. The red color came originally from beets, but now uses red food coloring, unless you really like beets. Banana pudding is always a hit, made with vanilla wafers, sliced bananas, vanilla pudding and whipped cream.

Okay, so what exactly is hummingbird cake? Basically a spice cake made with mashed banana, pineapple, pecans, cinnamon, and vanilla extract. It’s also a popular pie, which includes similar ingredients but poured into a pie crust. Old-timers swear you’ll sing like a bird when you take your first bite. (Why not nightingale pie? They sing more.) Or maybe it’s supposed to get your taste buds humming, You decide.